Spring 2021 brought us some very interesting anime. That includes ones that, luckily, we get to follow along with for more than twelve episodes—whether that’s through a longer first season or confirmed second. To Your Eternity is one of those at an even twenty episode count that’s spanned the spring and now summer season. But is it worth getting invested in?

Maybe you’re one of those people who always has to start what they finish even if by the first few episodes you know it’s not really your thing. And even if it just ends up sitting in that pile of “I’ll finish it one day…” Well to help anybody with this no-drop, show-hoarding policy, Miso’s taking a look at the first few episodes for you.


To Your Eternity

Key visual for To Your Eternity

A mysterious entity settles onto Earth to observe the planet and its creatures. Reasons unknown, and It too, unknown. It can mimic the appearance of things it sees if it watches them closely enough. After It changes from rock to plant It decides to tackle something more advanced. It discovers a dying wolf.

As the wolf, It wanders back to a desolate village. The wolf’s owner, a lonely boy left all alone, waits there and is overjoyed to see his companion return. It learns about many things there. The boy’s tragic past. His tragic dreams. Whatever further tragedy will befall him…but also warmth. The warmth of food, fire, shelter, love.

But eventually it must move on and continue to change.

My Thoughts

The first thing that stood out to me about To Your Eternity was the narrator. It is the first thing you hear after all. Unusual, especially for series nowadays, but it was a refreshing way to get a bit of info dump. Although info dump might be selling it short. Or long actually. There wasn’t much explanation at all. More of a poetic live commentary on our story’s beginning. It honestly set the mood very well. The vague, mystical atmosphere of this nowhere voice matched the main character.

Cast

Nameless Boy and Fushi/Joan from To Your Eternity

It was hard to spot the true main character at first. The changing, immortal orb is so lacking in Its own personality that you gravitate to the people It meets instead. Just like It does. The nameless boy that takes care of the wolf is a fine example. He is even on the cover…in a way. And we get to know him very quickly. Partly this is because, unlike the narration, the character dialogue in this anime gets exposition heavy. At least for the boy this makes sense. He’s all by himself; has been for years. Bound to get a little over-chatty with a wolf about your mental state in that situation. Plus he had such a sweet, endearing demeanor about him. However, it can still be a little jarring especially with characters following.

With this blank slate protagonist I thought I was in for a “monster (or story) of the week” type of show. A new friend, new place, new form in every episode or arc. But that wasn’t the case. Or doesn’t seem to be so far. After Its first meeting it sticks to the same few forms it already knows and only meets one new group which appears to be the story we’ll be following from now on. I’m not disappointed by that though.

I’m enjoying the time the creature, newly named “Fushi” has to learn in Its current form. It also adds some self to the character because it connects to Its fondness for the nameless boy. It helps not to erase all of that prologue. There’s a bond between me as a viewer and this character now. While the aspect of It still learning emotion and survival from this new cast of characters leaves that mysterious nature untouched.

Art

Speaking of nature, the scenery in To Your Eternity is quite lovely and particularly the nature filled settings. The scene design is wonderful and has a certain old fashioned charm to it. This goes for the character design and overall art style too. Although I will say one design seemed pretty out of place and on the lazier side which is especially disappointing since it’s for one of the first villains, Hayase.

Hayase from To Your Eternity
Ah yes…perfect armor for an intimidating antagonist.

The opening animation is somewhat overwhelming and almost feels slapped together because of how many elements they tried to include despite the art quality itself being completely fine. The more straightforward and clean shots used in the ending and show itself work much better for it.

Conclusion

But that aside, the charm of this show extends past art style. The entire atmosphere brings me back to older fantasy anime like Inuyasha but with a modern sensibility and a wholesome, simplistic Ghibli vibe to boot. I’m truly curious to see where it and the leading character will go. So I’m giving To Your Eternity’s first few episodes 3.5/5 miso soups. Although I have a strong feeling it could bump up in rating by the end.


That wraps up our first peek at To Your Eternity What did you think? Are you going to watch it? Or if you already have, do you agree with the review? Or maybe disagree? Let us know in the comments!

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